pearl harbor, Hawaii

The Day Japan Went Too Far


Silent and Solemn Visit
Visitors admire the panel honoring those who died during the bombing of the USS Arizona.
Aboard the Memorial
Public explores the memorial's open corridor overlooking the southern marine channel at Pearl Harbour.
USS Arizona Memorial
Memorial-museum of the battleship USS Arizona, one of the ships sunk by the Japanese Air Force
About to leave
Visitors leave the USS Arizona memorial museum building about to make the return trip to the coast.
List of Casualties
Couple stand at the wall that honors the victims of the USS Arizona.
Service Military
Military man descends the stairs to receive a new wave of visitors to the USS Arizona memorial museum.
USS Arizona sunk
Chimney of the battleship USS Arizona, slightly out of water due to the shallow depth of the seabed on which it rested.
Byodo corner in
Corner of the Byodo In Buddhist temple, one of the countless testimonies of the Japanese presence in Hawaii found on the island of Oahu.
Stars n' Stripes
US flag waving over the USS Arizona memorial.
kendo pose
Kendo practitioners hold an exhibition in the garden of the Byodo In Buddhist temple.
On December 7, 1941, Japan attacked the Pearl Harbor military base. Today, parts of Hawaii look like Japanese colonies but the US will never forget the outrage.

On the most famous Hawaiian avenue, most of the passers-by, customers and even residents are of Japanese origin, are subjects of the Emperor, on vacation, or emigrant workers who serve the former.

Many of the tall buildings along the waterline are owned by multimillion-dollar Japanese corporations financially supportive of their countrymen's historic presence and their latest bathing passion: Waikiki.

The first Japanese arrived aboard the Inawaka-maru, a cargo vessel that was caught in a snow and rain storm, strayed off the route between Kanagawa and Shimoda and ended up, mastless, stranded in the far west of the Hawaiian archipelago.

Between 1869 and 1885, imperial authorities barred immigration to Hawaii. But from then onwards, thousands of destitute Japanese could not resist the call of the sugar cane and pineapple plantations.

The Hawaiian monarchy refused to consider them citizens and the Japanese authorities acted to restore social respect for their own. At one point, the Japanese navy had a continuing presence and the Japanese began to influence Hawaiian politics.

The Americans feared that rivals would halt their annexation of the archipelago and cultivated a strong anti-Japanese feeling.

At the height of emigration in 1920, the Local Japanese or Kepani – as they are sometimes called – constituted 43% of the Hawaiian population.

The growing Americanization of their descendants had worried them for some time, and by that year they had built more than 150 Japanese schools attended by 98% of Japanese children. As we have been able to see, the care for the mother-identity continues to make sense.

On a weekend excursion to the interior of Oahu, we ended up with the Valley of the Temples and its Byodo-In temple, the local replica of the almost millenary shrine of Uji, located in the city hall of Kyoto.

Kendo Exhibition, Byodo-in, Oahu, Hawaii

Kendo practitioners hold an exhibition in the garden of the Byodo In Buddhist temple.

There, in the gardens by the lake full of carp (koi), an event commemorating Japanese culture takes place and a hostess introduces, in Japanese and English, several exhibitions: “the simulation of a combat of kendo, a martial art that evolved from the skill of the samurai in using the katana in the Japan but becoming more and more popular in Hawaii.”

after the kendo, other Japanese expressions are presented and the public is mostly nikkei it rejoices in the elegance and civilizational refinement of its ancestors.

In December 1941, Emperor Hirohito and his retinue of military commanders inaugurated a long period of war in which they would dishonor. Driven by the expansionist Nazi example, they decided to extend the overcrowded Japanese territory to the vast Pacific.

They began with the conquest of Malaysia and the Dutch East Indies, where they hoped to supply themselves with rubber, oil and other raw materials. For that, they needed to cancel the US naval force in charge of patrolling that area of ​​the world. The thousands of Japanese-blooded residents residing in Hawaii did not merit them any consideration.

On the morning of the 7th, six aircraft carriers launched 353 fighters, bombers and torpedo boats towards the island of Oahu. The Americans identified it at 252 km and issued the warning, but an official recently appointed to the position assumed that it was the expected arrival of 6 American B-17 bombers and chose not to validate the alarm.

The first planes arrived in Oahu at 7:48 am. The crew of American ships woke up to the sounds of alarms, bombs and gunfire.

They hurriedly dressed and rushed to their fighting posts while a loudspeaker message echoed “Air Pearl Harbor raid. This is not a drill” (Air Raid over Pearl Harbor, this is not an exercise) while the squad leader radioed the famous code “Torah, Torah, Torah” communicating that the mission was being accomplished perfectly.

American flag-USS Arizona, Pearl Harbour, Hawaii

US flag waving over the USS Arizona memorial.

Despite the surprise, some Yankee soldiers managed to respond to the 2nd and 3rd wave in vain. Ninety minutes into the attack, 18 vessels had been destroyed, as had 188 of the 402 planes parked there. Two thousand three hundred and eighty-six Americans lost their lives and 1139 were injured.

The day after the attack, Roosevelt delivered a speech in Congress that began with the famous phrase “Yesterday, December, 7 1941 – a date which will live in infamy – the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.”.

The Americans formally declared war on Japan. On December 11, Germany and Italy honored their commitments in the Tripartite Pact and declared war on the United States. The conflict thus became effectively global and would only end 4 years later.

The USA triumphed, prospered and confirmed itself as the great power of the world but never again forgot Pearl Harbor.

Only 17 kilometers of tarmac separates Waikiki from the cove, passed overlooking the tall buildings of Honolulu and the surrounding area, or in valleys bordered by verdant slopes. In the car park, there is a sign that warns that belongings left in vehicles can be stolen, but the authorities protect above all the security of the Military Base.

No backpacks or purses may be taken inside the complex. The cameras, these, have to be smaller than 30.5 cm and are filtered in detail by X-rays, which justifies the huge queue that makes visitors suffer under the tropical sun.

Almost all attractions are concentrated in the nearest dock area where – no longer surprised – photography is prohibited. The Submarine-Museum USS Bowfin and the Battleship Missouri stand out there, in which, later, General Douglas MacArthur accepted the Japanese surrender that put an end to World War II.

Together, these three vessels represent the beginning, the middle and the end of the conflict and the Americans ensured that its main events were narrated and explained in their interiors.

USS Arizona, Pearl Harbour, Hawaii

Memorial-museum of the battleship USS Arizona, one of the ships sunk by the Japanese Air Force

But the complex's most striking historical testimony, the USS Arizona, lies offshore, at the bottom of the cove, and the military on duty insists on protecting it as the dogmatized monument that, over time, they transformed it into.

A covered ferry transports visitors to the memorial. During the short navigation, the boastful and exaggerated military orders and reprimands are repeated to the point of ridicule: “Mister, put your arm inside the boat”, “young people, sit in the chairs if you don't mind”.

USS Arizona Military, Pearl Harbour, Hawaii

Military man descends the stairs to receive a new wave of visitors to the USS Arizona memorial museum.

During disembarkation, more than one person is warned simply because the one behind or to the side has passed, but castration does not stop there.

Much thanks to the efforts of Elvis Presley – who gave a meritorious concert and raised 50.000 dollars, more than 10% of the total value – the white structure of the sanctuary would be built over the central section of the vessel, with a geometry said to symbolize the initial defeat , the ultimate victory and eternal serenity.

The USS Arizona was directly hit by several bombs and sank in less than 9 minutes. It imprisoned its crew under water and over 80% of the men on board (1177) died. One of the 3 chambers in the sanctuary serves as his sepulcher.

The names of the victims are engraved on a marble wall and, from time to time, family members or friends come to pray for them or pay homage to them. It is the only permissible reason why the guards are so offended and furious every time someone embarks on dialogues, comments or even more noticeable whispers.

Pearl Harbor is one of the biggest wounds in the history of the American nation and the USS Arizona is still bleeding. We admire the top of its large surface chimney, through which a pump supposedly entered and, through the blue water of the lagoon, part of the remaining rusty structure.

Chimney USS Arizona, Pearl Harbour, Hawaii

Chimney of the battleship USS Arizona, slightly out of water due to the shallow depth of the seabed on which it rested.

The large cruiser contained about 5.5 million liters of oil "Bunker C”. After the attack, this fuel fueled a fire that lasted two and a half days, but that didn't even run out. It gradually submerges and renews colored stains that became known as the vessel's tears.

Environmentalists have already warned that if it is released, the oil left in the boat's deposits is enough to cause an environmental disaster and impede normal US Navy activity in the area.

USS Arizona Bridge, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Visitors leave the USS Arizona memorial museum building about to make the return trip to the coast.

But since 1982, authorities have allowed the ashes of 30 survivors of the USS Arizona to be deposited by divers under one of their gun turrets. The crew on it served before the sinking was and are allowed to drop theirs over the wreckage area.

Key West, USA

The Tropical Wild West of the USA

We've come to the end of the Overseas Highway and the ultimate stronghold of propagandism Florida Keys. The continental United States here they surrender to a dazzling turquoise emerald marine vastness. And to a southern reverie fueled by a kind of Caribbean spell.
Maui, Hawaii

Maui: The Divine Hawaii That Succumbed to Fire

Maui is a former chief and hero of Hawaiian religious and traditional imagery. In the mythology of this archipelago, the demigod lassos the sun, raises the sky and performs a series of other feats on behalf of humans. Its namesake island, which the natives believe they created in the North Pacific, is itself prodigious.
Military

Defenders of Their Homelands

Even in times of peace, we detect military personnel everywhere. On duty, in cities, they fulfill routine missions that require rigor and patience.
napali coast, Hawaii

Hawaii's Dazzling Wrinkles

Kauai is the greenest and rainiest island in the Hawaiian archipelago. It is also the oldest. As we explore its Napalo Coast by land, sea and air, we are amazed to see how the passage of millennia has only favored it.
Hiroshima, Japan

Hiroshima: a City Yielded to Peace

On August 6, 1945, Hiroshima succumbed to the explosion of the first atomic bomb used in war. 70 years later, the city fights for the memory of the tragedy and for nuclear weapons to be eradicated by 2020.
Mauna Kea, Hawaii

Mauna Kea: the Volcano with an Eye out in Space

The roof of Hawaii was off-limits to natives because it housed benevolent deities. But since 1968, several nations sacrificed the peace of the gods and built the greatest astronomical station on the face of the Earth.
Waikiki, OahuHawaii

The Japanese Invasion of Hawaii

Decades after the attack on Pearl Harbor and from the capitulation in World War II, the Japanese returned to Hawaii armed with millions of dollars. Waikiki, his favorite target, insists on surrendering.
Florida Keys, USA

The Caribbean Stepping Stone of the USA

Os United States continental islands seem to close to the south in its capricious peninsula of Florida. Don't stop there. More than a hundred islands of coral, sand and mangroves form an eccentric tropical expanse that has long seduced American vacationers.
Miami, USA

A Masterpiece of Urban Rehabilitation

At the turn of the 25st century, the Wynwood neighbourhood remained filled with abandoned factories and warehouses and graffiti. Tony Goldman, a shrewd real estate investor, bought more than XNUMX properties and founded a mural park. Much more than honoring graffiti there, Goldman founded the Wynwood Arts District, the great bastion of creativity in Miami.
tombstone, USA

Tombstone: the City Too Hard to Die

Silver veins discovered at the end of the XNUMXth century made Tombstone a prosperous and conflictive mining center on the frontier of the United States to Mexico. Lawrence Kasdan, Kurt Russell, Kevin Costner and other Hollywood directors and actors made famous the Earp brothers and the bloodthirsty duel of “OK Corral”. The Tombstone, which, over time, has claimed so many lives, is about to last.
Miami beach, USA

The Beach of All Vanities

Few coasts concentrate, at the same time, so much heat and displays of fame, wealth and glory. Located in the extreme southeast of the USA, Miami Beach is accessible via six bridges that connect it to the rest of Florida. It is meager for the number of souls who desire it.
Little Havana, USA

Little Havana of the Nonconformists

Over the decades and until today, thousands of Cubans have crossed the Florida Straits in search of the land of freedom and opportunity. With the US a mere 145 km away, many have gone no further. His Little Havana in Miami is today the most emblematic neighborhood of the Cuban diaspora.
Grand Canyon, USA

Journey through the Abysmal North America

The Colorado River and tributaries began flowing into the plateau of the same name 17 million years ago and exposed half of Earth's geological past. They also carved one of its most stunning entrails.
Mount Denali, Alaska

The Sacred Ceiling of North America

The Athabascan Indians called him Denali, or the Great, and they revered his haughtiness. This stunning mountain has aroused the greed of climbers and a long succession of record-breaking climbs.
Juneau, Alaska

The Little Capital of Greater Alaska

From June to August, Juneau disappears behind cruise ships that dock at its dockside. Even so, it is in this small capital that the fate of the 49th American state is decided.
Monument Valley, USA

Indians or Cowboys?

Iconic Western filmmakers like John Ford immortalized what is the largest Indian territory in the United States. Today, in the Navajo Nation, the Navajo also live in the shoes of their old enemies.
Talkeetna, Alaska

Talkeetna's Alaska-Style Life

Once a mere mining outpost, Talkeetna rejuvenated in 1950 to serve Mt. McKinley climbers. The town is by far the most alternative and most captivating town between Anchorage and Fairbanks.
Big Island, Hawaii

Searching for Rivers of Lava

There are five volcanoes that make the big island of Hawaii grow day by day. Kilauea, the most active on Earth, is constantly releasing lava. Despite this, we live a kind of epic to envision it.
Las Vegas, USA

Where sin is always forgiven

Projected from the Mojave Desert like a neon mirage, the North American capital of gaming and entertainment is experienced as a gamble in the dark. Lush and addictive, Vegas neither learns nor regrets.
Navajo nation, USA

The Navajo Nation Lands

From Kayenta to Page, passing through Marble Canyon, we explore the southern Colorado Plateau. Dramatic and desert, the scenery of this indigenous domain, cut out in Arizona, reveals itself to be splendid.
Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique, Wildlife, lions
safari
NP Gorongosa, Mozambique

The Wild Heart of Mozambique shows Signs of Life

Gorongosa was home to one of the most exuberant ecosystems in Africa, but from 1980 to 1992 it succumbed to the Civil War waged between FRELIMO and RENAMO. Greg Carr, Voice Mail's millionaire inventor received a message from the Mozambican ambassador to the UN challenging him to support Mozambique. For the good of the country and humanity, Carr pledged to resurrect the stunning national park that the Portuguese colonial government had created there.
Mount Lamjung Kailas Himal, Nepal, altitude sickness, mountain prevent treat, travel
Annapurna (circuit)
Annapurna Circuit: 2th - Chame a Upper BananaNepal

(I) Eminent Annapurnas

We woke up in Chame, still below 3000m. There we saw, for the first time, the snowy and highest peaks of the Himalayas. From there, we set off for another walk along the Annapurna Circuit through the foothills and slopes of the great mountain range. towards Upper Banana.
Sirocco, Arabia, Helsinki
Architecture & Design
Helsinki, Finland

The Design that Came from the Cold

With much of the territory above the Arctic Circle, Finns respond to the climate with efficient solutions and an obsession with art, aesthetics and modernism inspired by neighboring Scandinavia.
Bungee jumping, Queenstown, New Zealand
Adventure
Queenstown, New Zealand

Queenstown, the Queen of Extreme Sports

In the century. XVIII, the Kiwi government proclaimed a mining village on the South Island "fit for a queen".Today's extreme scenery and activities reinforce the majestic status of ever-challenging Queenstown.
Tiredness in shades of green
Ceremonies and Festivities
Suzdal, Russia

The Suzdal Cucumber Celebrations

With summer and warm weather, the Russian city of Suzdal relaxes from its ancient religious orthodoxy. The old town is also famous for having the best cucumbers in the nation. When July arrives, it turns the newly harvested into a real festival.
Camel Racing, Desert Festival, Sam Sam Dunes, Rajasthan, India
Cities
Jaisalmer, India

There's a Feast in the Thar Desert

As soon as the short winter breaks, Jaisalmer indulges in parades, camel races, and turban and mustache competitions. Its walls, alleys and surrounding dunes take on more color than ever. During the three days of the event, natives and outsiders watch, dazzled, as the vast and inhospitable Thar finally shines through.
young saleswoman, nation, bread, uzbekistan
Meal
Fergana Valley, Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan, The Nation That Does Not Lack Bread

Few countries employ cereals like Uzbekistan. In this republic of Central Asia, bread plays a vital and social role. The Uzbeks produce it and consume it with devotion and in abundance.
intersection
Culture
Hungduan, Philippines

Country Style Philippines

The GI's left with the end of World War II, but the music from the interior of the USA that they heard still enlivens the Cordillera de Luzon. It's by tricycle and at your own pace that we visit the Hungduan rice terraces.
Sport
Competitions

Man: an Ever Tested Species

It's in our genes. For the pleasure of participating, for titles, honor or money, competitions give meaning to the world. Some are more eccentric than others.
Eternal Spring Shrine
Traveling

Taroko George

Deep in Taiwan

In 1956, skeptical Taiwanese doubted that the initial 20km of Central Cross-Island Hwy was possible. The marble canyon that challenged it is today the most remarkable natural setting in Formosa.

Basotho Cowboys, Malealea, Lesotho
Ethnic
Malealea, Lesotho

Life in the African Kingdom of Heaven

Lesotho is the only independent state located entirely above XNUMX meters. It is also one of the countries at the bottom of the world ranking of human development. Its haughty people resist modernity and all the adversities on the magnificent but inhospitable top of the Earth that befell them.
ice tunnel, black gold route, Valdez, Alaska, USA
Got2Globe Photo Portfolio
Got2Globe Portfolio

Sensations vs Impressions

New Orleans Louisiana, First Line
History
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

The Muse of the Great American South

New Orleans stands out from conservative US backgrounds as the defender of all rights, talents and irreverence. Once French, forever Frenchified, the city of jazz inspires new contagious rhythms, the fusion of ethnicities, cultures, styles and flavors.
Balinese Hinduism, Lombok, Indonesia, Batu Bolong temple, Agung volcano in background
Islands
Lombok, Indonesia

Lombok: Balinese Hinduism on an Island of Islam

The foundation of Indonesia was based on the belief in one God. This ambiguous principle has always generated controversy between nationalists and Islamists, but in Lombok, the Balinese take freedom of worship to heart
Boats on ice, Hailuoto Island, Finland.
Winter White
Hailuoto, Finland

A Refuge in the Gulf of Bothnia

During winter, the island of Hailuoto is connected to the rest of Finland by the country's longest ice road. Most of its 986 inhabitants esteem, above all, the distance that the island grants them.
On the Crime and Punishment trail, St. Petersburg, Russia, Vladimirskaya
Literature
Saint Petersburg, Russia

On the Trail of "Crime and Punishment"

In St. Petersburg, we cannot resist investigating the inspiration for the base characters in Fyodor Dostoevsky's most famous novel: his own pities and the miseries of certain fellow citizens.
Okavango Delta, Not all rivers reach the sea, Mokoros
Nature
Okavango Delta, Botswana

Not all rivers reach the sea

Third longest river in southern Africa, the Okavango rises in the Angolan Bié plateau and runs 1600km to the southeast. It gets lost in the Kalahari Desert where it irrigates a dazzling wetland teeming with wildlife.
Sheki, Autumn in the Caucasus, Azerbaijan, Autumn Homes
Autumn
Sheki, Azerbaijan

autumn in the caucasus

Lost among the snowy mountains that separate Europe from Asia, Sheki is one of Azerbaijan's most iconic towns. Its largely silky history includes periods of great harshness. When we visited it, autumn pastels added color to a peculiar post-Soviet and Muslim life.
Seljalandsfoss Escape
Natural Parks
Iceland

The Island of Fire, Ice and Waterfalls

Europe's supreme cascade rushes into Iceland. But it's not the only one. On this boreal island, with constant rain or snow and in the midst of battle between volcanoes and glaciers, endless torrents crash.
Ptolemaic Egypt, Edfu to Kom Ombo, Nile above, guide explains hieroglyphics
UNESCO World Heritage
Edfu to Kom Ombo, Egypt

Up the River Nile, through the Upper Ptolemaic Egypt

Having accomplished the unmissable embassy to Luxor, to old Thebes and to the Valley of the Kings, we proceed against the current of the Nile. In Edfu and Kom Ombo, we surrender to the historic magnificence bequeathed by successive Ptolemy monarchs.
Earp brothers look-alikes and friend Doc Holliday in Tombstone, USA
Characters
tombstone, USA

Tombstone: the City Too Hard to Die

Silver veins discovered at the end of the XNUMXth century made Tombstone a prosperous and conflictive mining center on the frontier of the United States to Mexico. Lawrence Kasdan, Kurt Russell, Kevin Costner and other Hollywood directors and actors made famous the Earp brothers and the bloodthirsty duel of “OK Corral”. The Tombstone, which, over time, has claimed so many lives, is about to last.
Dunes of Bazaruto Island, Mozambique
Beaches
bazaruto, Mozambique

The Inverted Mirage of Mozambique

Just 30km off the East African coast, an unlikely but imposing erg rises out of the translucent sea. Bazaruto it houses landscapes and people who have lived apart for a long time. Whoever lands on this lush, sandy island soon finds himself in a storm of awe.
Rostov Veliky Kremlin, Russia
Religion
Rostov Veliky, Russia

Under the Domes of the Russian Soul

It is one of the oldest and most important medieval cities, founded during the still pagan origins of the nation of the tsars. At the end of the XNUMXth century, incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Moscow, it became an imposing center of orthodox religiosity. Today, only the splendor of kremlin Muscovite trumps the citadel of tranquil and picturesque Rostov Veliky.
Serra do Mar train, Paraná, airy view
On Rails
Curitiba a Morretes, Paraná, Brazil

Down Paraná, on Board the Train Serra do Mar

For more than two centuries, only a winding and narrow road connected Curitiba to the coast. Until, in 1885, a French company opened a 110 km railway. We walked along it to Morretes, the final station for passengers today. 40km from the original coastal terminus of Paranaguá.
Society
Cemeteries

the last address

From the grandiose tombs of Novodevichy, in Moscow, to the boxed Mayan bones of Pomuch, in the Mexican province of Campeche, each people flaunts its own way of life. Even in death.
Casario, uptown, Fianarantsoa, ​​Madagascar
Daily life
Fianarantsoa, Madagascar

The Malagasy City of Good Education

Fianarantsoa was founded in 1831 by Ranavalona Iª, a queen of the then predominant Merina ethnic group. Ranavalona Iª was seen by European contemporaries as isolationist, tyrant and cruel. The monarch's reputation aside, when we enter it, its old southern capital remains as the academic, intellectual and religious center of Madagascar.
Serengeti, Great Savannah Migration, Tanzania, wildebeest on river
Wildlife
Serengeti NP, Tanzania

The Great Migration of the Endless Savanna

In these prairies that the Masai people say syringet (run forever), millions of wildebeests and other herbivores chase the rains. For predators, their arrival and that of the monsoon are the same salvation.
Full Dog Mushing
Scenic Flights
Seward, Alaska

The Alaskan Dog Mushing Summer

It's almost 30 degrees and the glaciers are melting. In Alaska, entrepreneurs have little time to get rich. Until the end of August, dog mushing cannot stop.