Iceland


Thingvellir National Park, Iceland
The Origins of the Remote Viking Democracy
The foundations of popular government that come to mind are the Hellenic ones. But what is believed to have been the world's first parliament was inaugurated in the middle of the XNUMXth century, in Iceland's icy interior.
Iceland
The Geothermal Coziness of the Ice Island
Most visitors value Iceland's volcanic scenery for its beauty. Icelanders also draw from them heat and energy crucial to the life they lead to the Arctic gates.
Jok​ülsárlón Lagoon, Iceland
The Chant and the Ice
Created by water from the Arctic Ocean and the melting of Europe's largest glacier, Jokülsárlón forms a frigid and imposing domain. Icelanders revere her and pay her surprising tributes.
Iceland
The Island of Fire, Ice and Waterfalls
Europe's supreme cascade rushes into Iceland. But it's not the only one. On this boreal island, with constant rain or snow and in the midst of battle between volcanoes and glaciers, endless torrents crash.
Husavik a Myvatn, Iceland
Endless Snow on the Island of Fire
When, in mid-May, Iceland already enjoys some sun warmth but the cold and snow persist, the inhabitants give in to an intriguing summer anxiety.
Seydisfjordur, Iceland
From the Art of Fishing to the Fishing of Art
When shipowners from Reykjavik bought the Seydisfjordur fishing fleet, the village had to adapt. Today, it captures Dieter Roth's art disciples and other bohemian and creative souls.
Jökursarlón Lagoon, Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland
The Faltering of Europe's King Glacier
Only in Greenland and Antarctica are glaciers comparable to Vatnajökull, the supreme glacier of the old continent. And yet, even this colossus that gives more meaning to the term ice land is surrendering to the relentless siege of global warming.
Thingvelir, Origins Democracy Iceland, Oxará
Thingvellir National Park, Iceland

The Origins of the Remote Viking Democracy

The foundations of popular government that come to mind are the Hellenic ones. But what is believed to have been the world's first parliament was inaugurated in the middle of the XNUMXth century, in Iceland's icy interior.
Geothermal, Iceland Heat, Ice Land, Geothermal, Blue Lagoon
Iceland

The Geothermal Coziness of the Ice Island

Most visitors value Iceland's volcanic scenery for its beauty. Icelanders also draw from them heat and energy crucial to the life they lead to the Arctic gates.
Jok​ülsárlón Lagoon, Iceland

The Chant and the Ice

Created by water from the Arctic Ocean and the melting of Europe's largest glacier, Jokülsárlón forms a frigid and imposing domain. Icelanders revere her and pay her surprising tributes.
Seljalandsfoss Escape
Iceland

The Island of Fire, Ice and Waterfalls

Europe's supreme cascade rushes into Iceland. But it's not the only one. On this boreal island, with constant rain or snow and in the midst of battle between volcanoes and glaciers, endless torrents crash.
Horses under a snow, Iceland Never Ending Snow Island Fire
Husavik a Myvatn, Iceland

Endless Snow on the Island of Fire

When, in mid-May, Iceland already enjoys some sun warmth but the cold and snow persist, the inhabitants give in to an intriguing summer anxiety.
coast, fjord, Seydisfjordur, Iceland
Seydisfjordur, Iceland

From the Art of Fishing to the Fishing of Art

When shipowners from Reykjavik bought the Seydisfjordur fishing fleet, the village had to adapt. Today, it captures Dieter Roth's art disciples and other bohemian and creative souls.
Traveler above Jökursarlón icy lagoon, Iceland
Jökursarlón Lagoon, Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland

The Faltering of Europe's King Glacier

Only in Greenland and Antarctica are glaciers comparable to Vatnajökull, the supreme glacier of the old continent. And yet, even this colossus that gives more meaning to the term ice land is surrendering to the relentless siege of global warming.

Mapa


How to go


VISA AND OTHER PROCEDURES

Visas are not required for Portuguese and Brazilian citizens for stays with a tourist purpose of up to 90 days. It is only necessary to present a valid passport.

HEALTH CARE

No vaccine worthy of record. If visiting Iceland outside of the summer or planning to explore the island's higherlands, above all, make sure you are well prepared for the intense cold. 

For more information on traveling health, see the Health Portal of the Ministry of Health and Tropical and Traveler Medicine Clinic. In FitForTravel find country-specific health and disease prevention advice (in English).

TRIP TO ICELAND

A TAP (tel: 707 205 700) flies to various European destinations – Oslo, Manchester, Barcelona, ​​Alicante, Copenhagen etc. – from where you can complete the trip to Reykjavik with flights from Icelandair, full trip from 350€.

Must Do's


  • Reykjavik
  • Blue Lagoon
  • Akureyri
  • ​Lake Myvatn
  • Detifoss waterfall (most powerful in Europe)
  • Husavik (whale watching)
  • Seydisfjordur
  • Hofn
  • Vik
  • Jokulsárlón Lagoon
  • Golden Circle: Gullfoss, Seljalandsfoss and Skógafoss waterfalls; Geysir; Thingvellir National Park 

Explore


INTERNAL FLIGHTS

The absence of a rail network and highways makes flights and ferries the main form of travel to travel between the most distant points of the island. The most traveled route is Reykjavik – Akureyri. 

CAR RENTAL

A rugged 4WD car or vehicle guarantees you the best conditions to conveniently explore Iceland. That said, the bad news is that rentals are priced fairly high.

In high season, expect to pay at least €80 per day for a small SUV, €140 for the most basic 4WD vehicle and €200 for a caravan.

Even so, if you don't book well in advance, you may not be able to rent a car. You prices above include only the most basic insurance and, Iceland being rough in nature, it is advisable to protect the car a little better. Be aware that Icelandic rent-a-cars are less than merciful when it comes to claiming uncovered damage payments. And they charge according to Icelandic standards.

As was also to be expected, fuel is expensive, on average €1,50 per liter or more.

Another important piece of information is that Iceland's secondary roads – sometimes also the main ones – prove, at any time, to be an adventure in itself.

Out of summer, some appear so covered with ice and snow that, despite the colored stakes on the edges – it is almost impossible to see where they are headed. Other mishaps are the many herds of sheep, possible bad weather – including sudden melting of glaciers and eruption of volcanoes – and consequent landslides, flooding etc, etc. Most mountain roads remain closed until June, in certain years even into June.

TRUCK

You don't want to do this to yourself. Discovering Iceland by stopping where the bus stops will leave you devastated. Anyway, if you have no other alternative, buy your ticket from companies such as Iceland Excursions, Trex, Sterna, or SBK. Be aware that long-distance travel in Iceland has highly inflated costs. Iceland's central station is the BSI, in the capital Reykjavik.

SHIP

They only apply to whale watching excursions or trips to islands off Iceland such as Flatley or the Westman Islands. 

When to go


June and July – the peak of Icelandic summer – are considered the high season months, when the weather is more favorable and Iceland's summer nature shows off with all its exuberance. August, September and May are the intermediate months.

If you want to experience Iceland during the winter, choose November or March when the light hours are already more considerable. Remember that, although many of the attractions may be inaccessible, you will be rewarded with an impressive predominance of snow and ice and you will have the island practically all to yourself, with no difficulty finding places in hotels or guest houses. 

The best months to enjoy Northern Lights are September and March, coinciding with the equinoxes.

Money and costs


Iceland's currency is the Icelandic Krona (ISK) which depreciated significantly against the Euro during the 2008-2011 financial crisis but has already recovered substantially. There are ATMs in all villages and most service stations outside villages. Payment by credit cards is widespread.

ACCOMMODATION

There are a large number of hostels around the island, many belonging to Hostelling Internation Iceland that give discounts to members. In high season, expect to pay a minimum of €50 per person in a double room with a private bathroom. From €80 per person in a double room in a Bed & Breakfast and €100 in conventional hotels up to several hundred euros per night in the most sophisticated hotels on the island.

FOOD

In general, Iceland has Scandinavian-inspired prices that can fluctuate slightly depending on the price of the Icelandic krona.

As a reference, know that a simple hamburger can cost between €5 to €12, while a full meal in an average restaurant can cost between €25 and €100.

INTERNET

Many hotels, hostels and bars have free Wi-Fi even in the most remote places in the country. If you insist on having access at all times while traveling around the island, you will have to buy a SIM card for use in a smartphone unlocked or in a pen.